Australia Tibet Council

Enabling everyone in Australia to be part of change in Tibet


Tens of thousands of Buddhist faithful poured into the remote Himalayan monastery town of Tawang in northeast India this week—many traveling days over rough roads from distant mountain valleys—for a chance to see and hear a man they consider an embodiment of the divine: the Dalai Lama.

Defying repeated protests from China—which claims Tawang as part of its territory and decries the Tibetan spiritual leader as “a wolf in monk’s clothing” bent on fueling separatist unrest—the Dalai Lama was due to begin three days of public religious teachings there on Saturday.

Beyond the lessons on meditation and Buddhist belief, some see a larger aim in the visit of the increasingly frail, 81-year-old Dalai Lama. Anticipating his own death, he may wish to signal that he could choose, as Tibetan tradition allows, to be reborn in Tawang—still part of the Tibetan cultural sphere but safely outside China. Read more


On the eve of the first summit between President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping, a bipartisan legislation to promote access by Americans to Tibetan areas has been introduced by Senator Rubio (R-FL) and Baldwin (D-WI) in the Senate and by Congressmen McGovern (D-MI) and Hultgren (R-WI) in the House of Representatives of the United States Congress on April 4, 2017. The bill calls for Americans to receive the same access to Tibet that Chinese citizens enjoy in the United States.

The Chinese government’s restrictions on foreign access to Tibet are part of their attempt to cover up a policy of oppression, which denies basic human and civil rights to the Tibetan people. They have also imprisoned thousands of Tibetans for speaking their mind, as documented by the Congressional Executive Commission on China and human rights groups. Read more

Tibetan Diaspora observes Tibet Lobby Day

Published in Latest news
Tuesday, 28 March 2017

Tibetans in the US and Australia marked the Tibet Lobby Day on (March 27 and 28) to call for action on Tibet issues including deteriorating human rights situation in Tibet and lack of freedom of religion and speech in Tibet.

The US based International Campaign for Tibet (ICT) in association with Students for a Free Tibet (SFT) and Tibetan Associations in the US met with representatives of various US Senators to advocate on issues such as disappearance of 11th Panchen Lama, demolition of Larung Gar, environmental damages and arrest of language activist Tashi Wangchuk and writer Shokjang, among other issues.

Tibetans in Australia also met with several MPs and Senators to amplify the Tibet issue in Canberra. Stating human rights should come first, Senator Scott Ludlam in his message to the Australian government suggested that the government use its strong relationship with China to speak freely and honestly. Read more


Security has been intensified in an area of Kardze (Chinese: Ganzi) where a 24-year old Tibetan farmer, Pema Gyaltsen, set fire to himself on March 18 near a monastery.
 
A video has emerged from another area in Kardze, Serthar (Chinese: Seda), which appears to show Tibetan pedestrians in traditional clothes being attacked and brutally beaten by police. A voice over removed from the video footage, circulated by Voice of America, reflects shock and sadness among onlookers, with one voice saying over and over again, “They are doing this for no reason at all.”
 
Tensions are high in the Serthar area, which is close to the religious institute of Larung Gar, also in Kardze Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture in Sichuan, the Tibetan area of Kham. Images and video of more demolitions at the religious institute over the last few days are circulating on social media. Read more