Australia Tibet Council

Enabling everyone in Australia to be part of change in Tibet

Tibetan Delegation To Meet With Over 30 Members And Senators To Discuss Crisis In Tibet

Friday, 16 March 2012

A delegation of Tibetan-Australians will meet with over 30 Members and Senators on Monday, 19 March, as part of the Tibet Advocacy Project. This is the first time a group of Tibetans from across Australia are putting the case for Tibet directly with their parliamentarians in the nation's capital.

The new initiative comes in the wake of an escalating crisis in Tibet, which has seen up to 28 Tibetans setting themselves on fire in acts of protests and a fresh wave of mass demonstrations across many towns in eastern Tibet. With Tibet closed to journalists, tourists and all outside observers, the Chinese government has brought in large numbers of paramilitary and armed police forces into the restive Tibetan areas.

A delegation of Tibetan-Australians will meet with over 30 Members and Senators on Monday, 19 March, as part of the Tibet Advocacy Project. This is the first time a group of Tibetans from across Australia are putting the case for Tibet directly with their parliamentarians in the nation's capital. The new initiative comes in the wake of an escalating crisis in Tibet, which has seen up to 28 Tibetans setting themselves on fire in acts of protests and a fresh wave of mass demonstrations across many towns in eastern Tibet.

With Tibet closed to journalists, tourists and all outside observers, the Chinese government has brought in large numbers of military and armed police forces into the restive Tibetan areas. 38-year-old monk Jamyang Palden, the latest Tibetan to set himself alight on 14 March, was a close friend of Brisbane-based delegate Lobsang Lungtok, a former political prisoner who moved to Australia ten years ago. Lobsang Lungtok and the other 11 Tibetan advocates will call on the Government to raise publicly its concerns over the situation in Tibet, request permission for a fact-finding delegation to Tibetan areas and seek substantive improvements in the situation facing the Tibetan people as we progress the economic and strategic cooperation between Australia and China.

Project leader Kyinzom Dhongdue said: "We want to draw our political leaders' attention to the seriousness of the crisis in Tibet. We will suggest practical steps that any Australian parliamentarian can take to support a peaceful resolution at this critical time for Tibet." The Tibet Advocacy Project is an important step in the campaign for Tibet's future. "As a major provider of the resources that are powering China's economic transformation, Australia has a level of engagement with China shared by only a few other countries. We are exceptionally well-positioned to help bring about a better future for the Tibetan people." The 12 advocates, including three each from NSW, ACT, Queensland and Victoria, are meeting individually with over 30 parliamentarians, covering every state and territory and every major party.

Contact: Kyinzom Dhongdue, Australia Tibet Council 0416 695 590